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activism ~ “Pakeha Anger: Why Do They get Mad at Maori?”

activism ~ Cognitive Dissonance succinctly explained ❤

For More Please Visit: https://kupumamae.com

Exploring the Depths of the Maori Experience


So on one beautiful Sunday arvo in downtown Auckland, I was out having a couple of catch-up beers with the cuz, when we unexpectedly got talking to a Pakeha, let’s call him Joe. In his late thirties, living in a predominantly Pakeha populated, small town in Southland, Joe has worked hard his whole life, made a decent way for himself and his family, which forms his philosophy and worldview towards living – work hard and reap the rewards. And so, according to Joe and his life philosophy, anybody that can’t make a life for themselves should suffer the consequences for being lazy and useless, which led him to offer opinions on Maori issues such as;

“Maori come from an aggressive culture and so Maori need to whiten up”
“The land is not Maori’s, as the Maori sold it and so Maori need to get over it”
“Maori/Pakeha conflict is a North Island thing…

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mauri of me #32 ~ he kākano āhau

He Kākano Āhau (Born Of Greatness) ~ Hohepa Tamehana, 2001

 

Lyrics

He kākano āhau

I ruia mai i Rangiātea

And I can never be lost

I am a seed, born of greatness

Descended from a line of chiefs,

He kākano āhau

Ki hea rā āu e hītekiteki ana

Ka mau tonu i āhau ōku tikanga

Tōku reo, tōku oho-oho,

Tōku reo, tōku māpihi maurea

Tōku whakakai marihi

My language is my strength,

An ornament of grace.

Ka tū ana āhau,

Ka ūhia au e ōku tipuna

My pride I will show

That you may know who I am

I am a warrior, a survivor

He mōrehu āhau.

Ki hea rā āu e hītekiteki ana

Ka mau tonu i āhau ōku tikanga

Tōku reo, tōku oho-oho,

Tōku reo, tōku māpihi maurea

Tōku whakakai marihi

My language is my strength,

An ornament of grace.

 

Translation

I am a seed

Scattered from Rangiatea

And I can never be lost

I am a seed, born of greatness

Descended from a line of chiefs,

I am a seed.

Wherever I may roam

I will hold fast to my traditions.

My language is my cherished possession

My language is the object of my affection

My precious adornment

My language is my strength,

An ornament of grace.

Whenever I stand,

I am clothed by my ancestors

My pride I will show

That you may know who I am

I am a warrior, a survivor

I am a remnant

Wherever I may roam

I will hild fast to my traditions.

My language is my cherished possession

My language is the object of my affection

My precious adornment

My language is my strength,

An ornament of grace.

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i don’t wanna talk about it ~ gatshredder

I Don’t Wanna Talk About It ~ Gatshredder

i found it :)

Not being the typical blogger … I know nothing about stats, notifications … doing things ‘the right way’. I don’t blog to become famous, or for money (bahahaha), or because I actually know a lot 😉

I blog … because … ummm …

Ok, its cheaper and easier than going to counselling …

No really … I do it for very respectable cathartic shit (please go to the About Page for that … I can’t remember what it was … )

Any who – a fellow blogger was talking about the Map of where people come from, that come and visit your blog. Took Me a little while – but eureka! I found it 🙂

And the winner is: America?!

Wait – So no-one in New Zealand loves Me ? 😦

Oh Well.

So this was my achievement of the day. I know right 🙂

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activism ~ misogynistic laws

However you dress this proposed policy up, it is completely and utterly misogynistic in its entirety.

Only ‘beneficiaries’ would be made to have contraception, noting that ‘taxpayers’ shouldn’t have to foot the bill for women having unplanned pregnancies. It doesn’t take into account those that had planned pregnancies and still needed financial assistance.

To boot, our abortion laws are archaic and women are penalised for choosing this as an option also.  Which ever way you look at it, women are penalised and punished for an act they didn’t complete on their own!

 

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dragons and demons ~ herbs

Dragons and Demons – Herbs, 1981

From

 https://meptsdandallthefuckedupshitinbetween.wordpress.com/2015/07/01/beginning-of-something-else-1987/

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activism ~ de-colonisation

It is pre-election scramble time in our country at the moment, and we are being pummelled with the likes of ‘Hobsons Pledge’ and their bullshit rhetoric. This lot are espousing their version of ‘lets make america great again’ hate speech. ‘Hobson’ assisted with the treaty, flaws and all. Thats all I have to say about that asshole.

What H.P don’t really grasp, is you can’t move forward, as a nation of ‘togethers’, or anything else for that matter, when you don’t acknowledge the deception employed to be residing in this country in the first place. You can’t move forward when you are still labelling ‘the savages’ with the same old stereotypical bullshit that was utilised in the 1800s; and then blaming them for said bullshit. Paying them off with a few million dollars, isn’t an apology and admission of wrongs. Its just a pay off.

I think what I find the most revolting about the ‘way’ we were colonised / brutalised / stolen from; is the deceit and manipulation. Not that being completely annihilated would have been better; and the fact that we are reminded that we ‘didn’t get it as bad as the Australian Indigenous or the Indigenous peoples of ‘Turtle Island’, is also a gigantic smack in the face.

Instead, a bunch of festering retards rode up in their boats, made themselves at home and went about befriending ‘the natives’; plying us with disease, alcohol and Jesus. And as we died off by the thousands, they pointed towards their God and declared that we were being punished.

The missionaries had their place in all of this disgusting treachery and as the Treaty was being signed, they translated a not so accurate version from their English to their Maori language. Knowing full well that it was not accurate, they continued to proclaim their God would watch over this ‘partnership’.

You see, colonisation 101 wasn’t always manipulation. It used to be anihilation. Cultural extermination and genocide, in the name of God – until some cocky bastard realised they could utilise the savages for labour. That was around about the time slavery was becoming a little more ‘frowned upon’ pfft.

However, to utilise a people for labour without utilising slavery, one must make sure the people want or feel they ‘need’ what is being ‘sold’ to them.

Why work for a bunch of wankers right?

So in the mind-fuck that is colonisation, as the indigenous were dying off from foreign diseases and the colonial asshats were pointing at the white jesus for redemption; another disease took hold. This one lingers today.

The belief that We are un-able to survive without the intervention of the colonist; the government; religion. That we are undesirable, unlearned, uneducated and uncivilised. And because we have come to believe these things, and our inability to survive, we continue to buy into what we are being sold and end up returning to the dysfunctional system that sold us the lie in the first place, believing that they have the answers because they are superior.

After all, they ‘saved’ us from so much pfft.

Until we can undo the mindset that keeps us bound to them and see it for what it really is … until we can listen to who we really are … what we survived … how brilliant our ancestors were … how brilliant we are … then we will keep going around in circles, following the lie that we have been fed for years.

In a nutshell: Colonisation was designed to gain control over people and resources. Decolonisation is the act of freeing oneself from that control.

*****

From YouTube:

Published on Sep 25, 2016
Colonisation and apartheid were cruel acts that were designed to facilitate mass extraction of resources by creating mass impoverishment.
In this message;
1. We explore the 3 systems that were used to entrench
2. The effect on the black collective conscious
3. What we must do to nullify the psychological effects of the past.

 

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artivism ~ speaking of police violence

they say there is none.

.

a myth made up by those

who are criminally inclined

those that break windows

in a sleepy little town,

those who drink to get drunk

those who disturb

the peace, and the peaceful.

those that deserve

everything they get.

.

i wonder what those

well informed souls

believe about those in

the neighbouring vicinities

who under the ever watchful mauri,

of the black sands and maunga majestic,

tilled their soil

in peaceful protest

against the armed constabulary

ordered to remove them from their homes.

“As fears grew among white settlers that the resistance campaign was a prelude to renewed armed conflict,[6] the Hall Government began planning a military assault at Parihaka to close it down.[7] Pressured by Native Minister John Bryce, the government finally acted in late October 1881 while the sympathetic Governor was out of the country. Led by Bryce, on horseback, 1600 troops and cavalry entered the village at dawn on 5 November 1881.[8] The soldiers were greeted with hundreds of skipping and singing children offering them food. Te Whiti and Tohu were arrested and jailed for 16 months, 1600 Parihaka inhabitants were expelled and dispersed throughout Taranaki without food or shelter and the remaining 600 residents were issued with government passes to control their movement. Soldiers looted and destroyed most of the buildings at Parihaka. Land that had been promised as reserves by a commission of inquiry into land confiscations was later seized and sold to cover the cost of crushing Te Whiti’s resistance, while others were leased to European settlers, shutting Māori out of involvement in the decisions over land use.”

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activism ~ police violence

Police Violence has been highlighted in big bold neon signs recently. And the continuing conversations still read like something out of the dark ages.

Recently there was an article published, relating to the fatal shooting by New Zealand Police, of a 57 year old man. The tone of the discussion on this article, was one of blaming the dead guy and ‘people like him’, and praising the police for their excellent service.

I noted the following point:

“We seem to be missing the fact that they (poupou) are trained to restrain and use other tactics BEFORE shooting someone, irreversibly, dead. And they are employed, by us, to protect and serve, not shoot dead and ask questions later. I don’t think we have the right to blame a dead guy. But we should be holding all civil servants accountable for their actions. Especially irreversible ones.”
Like · Reply · June 10 at 7:02pm

And was met with a tirade of verbal abuse all singing the same tune:

“Police in New Zealand do not shoot and kill people just because they can. You’ve obviously been watching too many videos of cops in America to understand that police have strict guidelines when it comes to shooting people.”
Like · Reply · 3 · June 10 at 8:26pm

Now this kind of mentality is nothing new. But what surprised me the most, is that even with history a click away, and recent events relating to police brutality, in our country and those abroad, also only a click away; Naivety and ignorance still reigns supreme.

As a country, we should be asking … what the hell?! This isn’t about blaming the police; this is about asking questions about a public service and their performance. We seem to have more concern about the performance of who is picking up the rubbish from our front gate, than how our ‘law enforcement’ are enforcing.

We should be asking why the police are taught to racially profile. Shouldn’t this ‘profiling’ be focussed on an a specific action or behaviour instead of trying to brush stroke an entire community with a stereotype based on an ethnocentric ideology?

And yes, the new Zealand police are taught to racially profile. Why do you think Maori are more likely to be pulled over – arrested – and locked up? It has nothing to do with our actions but entirely, what we ‘look’ like.

Do we remember the last time this happened?

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feature photographer: jono rotman

Jono Rotman is a New Zealand photographer, whose artistry I like and admire.

Gow Langsford Gallery  notes Jono’s work as exploring: “… the continuing cataclysm of colonization, and the collision of civilization and the natural world. Among his subjects in New Zealand are sites of incarceration and gangs. In America, he is exploring the decline of empire. His often large-scale works of subjects great and terrible are a controlled meditation on the sublime.”

His work has raised an eyebrow or two and he has received criticism of his depictions of gang members. For Me however, some of those depicted, have been family and friends, and I appreciate the view and expression he has taken is his gallantry depictions of them. I also believe that if art such as this produces discussion, then that is a good thing.

This photo is from Gow Langsford Gallery Jono Rotman Exhibition 30 April – 24 May 2014, reproduced by ABC News.

To view more of Jono Rotmans work please go to http://www.jonorotman.com

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