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parihaka. the peaceful protest.

we are told that there is solidarity

cohesion

and strength

in employing

a peaceful protest stance

a passive resistance stance

a standing united

together

stance.

.

Let me tell you about a great protest

of peaceful resistance

of strength and solidarity.

the feathers that they wore

the sweat of their brow

the unwavering focus

that they used.

let me tell you of the multitudes

of peoples;

of women

of children

who defended

peacefully

without malice

without violence.

 

let me tell you of the pillage

that was behest upon them

because of that peaceful

passive

resistance.

and the apology

that followed

nigh 150 years later.

the minimal apology

doused with arrogance

and flounce

backed up

with a cool few million.

Parihaka will forever be a stand for what is right

followed by the screams of loss.


kpm ©


 

 

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how we respond

I was at a Hui (meeting/gathering) a few years ago … one of those ‘this is going to change the way I think’ sort of gatherings.

The jist of it all was how best to respond to The Crown in relation to all their past, current and continued breaches of Te Tiriti O Waitangi and the Indigenous in Aotearoa (New Zealand). Te Tiriti O Waitangi is one of our founding documents in New Zealand … It’s why any and all immigrant / European peoples were able to settle here. It was also supposed to be a partnership between The Crown and the Indigenous, to enable them to reside here, and us to retain autonomy. The Crowns first breach came within months of signing and we, Tangata Whenua (indigenous/people of the land), have been talking, debating, strategizing, fighting … ever since. Each generation has done their piece … added to the history of reconciliation, reparation, justice and moving on. The Crown however, jumped from the discussions straight to the ‘moving on’ bit … and their idea of moving on entails the Indigenous shutting their mouths and getting on with being imprisoned, living in an impoverished state … generally being at the bottom of the barrel.

Anyway, at this Hui it was discussed that we had done and tried virtually everything short of revolution by violence. And while there were many that still thought this to be the only option; there was another voice that got heard that day. An old guy .. who’d obviously lived a long, enlightened life.

He started talking about the way we had always done things … the things we had done so far. That we, too, were skipping a step. He believed that our tipuna (ancestors) had carried an enormous amount of grief over the rape and pillage that had been done to us as a people and the land, that we were entrusted to care for.

He believed we had already done everything that we needed to, in response to the Crowns breaches and continued atrocities. And that the issue or the problem, didn’t lie with Us.

He said … that the issue was who we were dealing with; their lack of mana (dignity); that they continuously move the goal posts, because that is their nature. They had and have no intention of being honourable and trustworthy. Of doing the right thing. We gave them the benefit of the doubt and it cost us generations of lives and livelihood. But history should tell US that their core intentions have never changed. Colonisation was always their intention, not partnership.

None of this was said in malice, which I thought was astonishing. But in closing he said, well asked … what are we going to do differently?

By that he meant, we had tried it The Crowns way … we had let them define the boundaries in which we respond. That we needed to stop doing that and find a way to respond that is ON OUR TERMS and is in the best interests of US.

So when we marched to Parliament, this time, we did it in silence, (hikoi wahangu), with the intention of taking our tipunas maemae (grief) and laying it where it belonged … returning it to the abusers so to speak . Along with legislation that has been breached since 1840.

This was the last land march/protest I did. It was most profound and extremely hard to explain. We could feel the weight of sadness move with us; what should have taken about 20 minutes to walk, took close to 2 hours. But it didn’t feel like it. Everything went quiet … and we were in the city … all the traffic went silent; even the birds went silent. All you could hear was us walking. And the gentle weeping from the old people who were with us.

And while the mainstream media down played the whole thing, as they do .. It was one of the most memorable and life changing land marches I’ve ever done. Because our intention was different than other times.

We got to respond as we needed to, not how ‘They’ wanted us too.


kpm ©


 

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women don’t …

I was recently informed that my ‘cursing’ and how I ‘speak’, can be intimidating.

Thats right; intimidating.

At first I was slightly offended so questioned the bearer of these good tidings, as to their interpretation of this statement.

They espoused that ‘people generally’, don’t like the use of profanity as a second language, especially in a public setting (physical or cyber spacey … *eye ball roll*) and that its use sounds … ‘protesty’ … and draws attention to ones self.

But wait, theres more.

Capital letters are indicative of Anger or Yelling.

The speaker pauses and waits for a response …

And is still waiting, because I chose not to make any rebuttal with this fuckhead.

But I thought the points were interesting … not, ‘generalised’ interesting … more like … Oh, you’re one of those dicks that likes to use manipulation and ‘they say’ tactics to silence women.

‘Go fuck yourself’.

Thats all.

ps: my favourite meme ;)

(not my meme)


kpm ©


 

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speaking of racism & police violence

they say there is none.

.

a myth made up by those

who are criminally inclined

those that break windows

in a sleepy little town,

those who drink to get drunk

those who disturb

the peace, and the peaceful.

those that deserve

everything they get.

.

i wonder what those

well informed souls

believe about those in

the neighbouring vicinities

who under the ever watchful mauri,

of the black sands and maunga majestic,

tilled their soil

in peaceful protest

against the armed constabulary

ordered to remove them from their homes.

“As fears grew among white settlers that the resistance campaign was a prelude to renewed armed conflict,[6] the Hall Government began planning a military assault at Parihaka to close it down.[7] Pressured by Native Minister John Bryce, the government finally acted in late October 1881 while the sympathetic Governor was out of the country. Led by Bryce, on horseback, 1600 troops and cavalry entered the village at dawn on 5 November 1881.[8] The soldiers were greeted with hundreds of skipping and singing children offering them food. Te Whiti and Tohu were arrested and jailed for 16 months, 1600 Parihaka inhabitants were expelled and dispersed throughout Taranaki without food or shelter and the remaining 600 residents were issued with government passes to control their movement. Soldiers looted and destroyed most of the buildings at Parihaka. Land that had been promised as reserves by a commission of inquiry into land confiscations was later seized and sold to cover the cost of crushing Te Whiti’s resistance, while others were leased to European settlers, shutting Māori out of involvement in the decisions over land use.”


kpm ©


 

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